Williamson takes wing

Genevieve Williamson (Jibby and Juna) started out to make polymer icicle ornaments and ended up with these cool, fluttery feathers. The ornaments that she stamped and painted and carved may morph into winged pendants. Sometimes our muse leads us off in new directions.

I’m winging off to California today for a holiday visit. My camera and computer have traveled with me, of course, and I’m keeping my eyes open for polymer clay of the west coast variety.

Lehmann’s cosmic polymer

Jana Lehmann (Feeliz) from Stuttgart, Germany, has added a blog (in addition to her Flickr pages) where you can watch her polymer clay progress.

Taking classes with Grant Diffendaffer and Donna Kato helped her refine her technique and find her own “cosmic” voice. Jana’s playful planets and dimensional space beads are smartly crafted from a bright luscious color palette.

The color studies she’s created from lessons in Lindly and Maggie’s color book look like paint store swatches and make me want create a new set.

Lam’s nominees

Two more additions to the Niche nominees from Loretta Lam. Her finalists are Come Dancin’ in the polymer category (hey, we talked about that piece in August) and Hanging Basket (pictured here) in the fashion jewelry category.

Loretta says of all the entries, “Can’t you feel the winds of change? We will soon be sitting at the big kids’ table!”

Finding a subject to talk about has been easy as these award nominees floated in. I may have to return to regular research and web surfing for tomorrow’s news.

Voila! launches

To keep everyone up to date on the growing interest in polymer clay in Europe, the UK’s Christine Dumont has launched a new site called Voila! that gathers works and news from around the EU. You’ll want to sign up to get all the information. (Those are Christine’s own butterfly beads at the left.)

Reporting on the recent Euro Clay Carnival in France, the Voila site shows this pendant from Holland’s Saskia Veltnaar (Sassy & Co.) which tweaks Bettina Welker’s etching technique by undercutting, shaping and bending the layers.

Thanks to Marjon Donker for sending the link. My Minneapolis meeting was a success and I’m processing all that I learned. More on that later this week.

Polymer/stone hybrid

daniela_stone

This polymer clay embellished amethyst stone from Italy’s Daniela (Alkhymeia) is appealing. The “hybrid” 3D look is very trendy. Daniela is a wire expert as well and you’ll find tutorials among the galleries of work on her site, in her Flickr photos, on her Facebook page and even in her Deviant gallery.

Here are some older polymer/resin and polymer/glass combinations, similar but different, from Klew.

Thanks to Randee Ketzel for the link.

Lyrical polymer from Lombardi and Holler

Rome’s Marina Lombardi (Ali di Libellula) makes lyrical jewelry by pairing delicate polymer clay focal pieces with pearls, filigree, stones and crystals. She coaxes microspheres into just the right spots for hints of color and texture.

Her pieces are often photographed with a bit of reference material in the background – wallpapers, fresoes, illustrations. It’s very effective and there’s more on her Flickr site.

Marco Holler sometimes collaborates with Lombardi. The duo dressed up a swirl lentil bead by adding an image transfer and gold embellishment to produce these beautiful romantic Italian earrings. See more of their collaborations here.

It all puts me in mind of vineyards and villas and vacations. Have a great weekend.

Reid’s polymer clay minerals

New Jersey’s Kathryn Reid (aka PendulumStudios1) has bounded onto the Flickr and Etsy polymer clay scene with beads that beg to be touched. She’s attached names like mineral, earthen, lichen, and moons to her smooth pod-shaped creations.

Colorful translucent cane patterns are applied over glittering base beads as with the “Day and Night” beads shown here. See more of Kathryn’s work on her Etsy site.

Her secret? “I believe that my jewelry is inspired by the freedom that comes from not thinking about what I’m trying to do.”

Extreme Mokume from McGuire

Making mokume gane in polymer clay is an exercise in finding the balance between control and chaos. It can easily become a jumble of patterns and a stew of colors. These mokume earrings and pendant by Barbara McGuire show what can happen when you master the technique.

Barbara is teaching her “Extreme Mokume Gane” (as well as two “faces” classes) at Bead and Button in Minneapolis Milwaukee this June.

A list of all the polymer clay classes being offered at Bead and Button is available here. Thanks to Ronna Weltman for the heads-up.

French polymer clay connections

Poking through the polymer clay on the French PerleRouge site launched me into an afternoon at the computer. (I’ve streamlined the trip for you.)

I surfed from there to Crea’Sofimo (pendant at the left) who credits Mathilde Colas (the green necklace to the right) as her teacher and inspiration. Somehow I landed on the site of Cecilia Mabcrea, a French artist working in Xiamen, China.

This whirlwind web surfing made me marvel at how fast concepts travel and at the polymer clay community with its connections that span the globe.