Mills collaborates

Libby Mills polymer circle pendant

Libby Mills just pulled this beauty out of the oven and it has comes to you with a story.

The color palette she selected from her Moo cards! She selected 50 Colourlovers palettes that she loved and had a set made to use for inspiration and later to use as jewelry tags.

Mills collage materials

It’s a traveling personal paint sample set. Pick a card from your deck for instant inspiration. (These snapshop colors aren’t accurate but you get the idea.)

Libby’s background textures came from tablemate Laurie Propheter who uses textured fabric swatches to impress into clay. (Laurie has a great selection that she sells on Etsy.) A few extrusions later (see the canes) and Libby’s perked up her palette.

Quilted polymer

Dumauvobleu polymer pendant

Because my vacation mates are serging and sewing I’m drawn to France’s Cathy (Dumauvobleu) whose pendants resemble quilted and collaged fabrics. Here’s her Etsy shop.

Cathy textures layered and collaged canes and strips of colors to achieve a sunny mix that blends into a cohesive design.

The link comes to us from Betsy Baker. Betsy’s published some new work and a couple of tutorials that you’ll want to examine.

Perfection in imperfection

Brady's journal pendant
Brady's pendant inside inscription

The inscription inside Marlene Brady’s polymer and bead journal project pendant reads, “If malice or envy were tangible and had a shape, it would be the shape of a boomerang.” The quote is by Charley Reese.

Marlene was frustrated with the way the transfer smeared and blogged about her dissatisfaction with her art. Her readers had a different reaction. Reading their comments is a treat. They were struck, as I was, with the color and liveliness of the pieces that convey Marlene’s heartfelt sentiments so effectively.

She says, “My Bead Journal Projects are my way of giving myself permission to process negative feelings in a positive way.” Marlene’s inspiring pieces are a lesson for all the recovering perfectionists out there.

Paths to color

Bohmer's easy dot necklace
Niqui's chunk necklace

Belgium’s Nicole (NiQui) brings us chunks of color to jolt us into a new week.

Germany’s Margit Bohmer starts us off with a graphic polymer necklace dotted in primary colors that she says is an easy one to make.

France’s Céline Charuau (GrisBleu) startles us with a bright polymer and metal poppy.

Charuau's poppy pendant

There’s no escaping color this week even if the snow is all around us. Thumb through these three artists’ sites and you’ll how they share a love of color and take three very different approaches to making it part of their designs.

Faceted polymer beads

Lunger's faceted polymer beads

I was distracted yesterday. First I was drawn to these faceted polymer beads from Lynn Lunger (UnaOdd). She bought herself a belt sander to be able to achieve that flat-sided effect.

She even has a rainbow version and more in her Etsy shop. Oooh, the possibilities. Would my husband notice the polymer dust on his belt sander?

Lunger's faceted polymer pendant

Then I decided to tinker with the guts of this web site. Diving into the belly of the blog is a sure way to grind things to a halt. Bingo! All of this left me speechless (hence yesterday’s terse post). I thought those lovely hearts would speak for themselves but some of you thought I was ill or irritated. Not so.

It’s thinly disguised avoidance behavior. Finishing my Synergy slide presentation is looming large and everything else but that calls to me. Back to PowerPoint today. Wish me luck (and clairvoyance) as I predict the future of polymer.

Haitian polymer art

Moro Baruk's polymer art from Haiti

Moro Baruk is a polymer clay artist living in Haiti. He’s posted a couple of pictures of how the earthquake damaged his building and shook its occupants. “I am afraid to open the metal doors for fear the walls would collapse on me,” he says.

“My wife and I moved to Haiti in 1979 to help strengthen a Bahá’í community. We own and run a craft factory and we export throughout the Caribbean, the USA and France,” he explains on his site.

His pictures bring the disaster closer to us. Start your week by counting your blessings and helping when you can. The link was sent to us from Saskia Veltenaar in the Netherlands.

First Giveaway Results

The lucky winner of the Judy Belcher earrings is Arizona’s Marlene Brady. The giveaway was fun and you’ll have another chance to win soon.

Ehmeier designs with scraps

ehmeier carved polymer pendant

When you look through Eva Ehmeier’s (Hoedlgut) photos, you’ll note that her most carefree and attention-grabbing designs are made from what she calls “scrap” polymer clay.

ehmeier carved polymer pendant

She carved and combined this series of pastel polymer circles into linked pendants that look perfect for spring.

It’s a good reminder that when we stop seeing the material as precious and the project as important, we often free ourselves to do our best work. Enjoy Eva’s “scraps.”

Small polymer pleasures

Little things count at this time of year. I’m trying to finish my chores so that I can try something from my stash of miniature holiday polymer clay designs. Maybe you have time to play.

The teensy gingerbread house is from Israel’s Shay Aaron. The stocking earrings are from Croatia’s SandrArt. Both tree designs look jolly. The stacking ones are from Australia’s Amanda Hunt. The other one is California’s Kim Korringa’s. Little things sometimes bring big pleasure.

Breil’s texture tricks

Helen Breil takes using stamps and textures to a new level with her most recent polymer clay focal beads. She introduces surprises and layers colors to provide drama.

I often hesitate to use stamps because they feel static. Helen has overcome that shortcoming with a bag of tricks that makes me want to try again. Looking at her design idea gallery is like taking a workshop.

I’m composing this post from 30,000 ft. in between time zones. Tomorrow is all about jet lag and preparing for an evening class at Craftcast.com. California beaches provided a heap of pebble research and I’m pumped for the class. Join us.